Select Page

Water Cycle Information

Water exists in multiple forms throughout the water cycle. There are bodies of water, such as ponds, lakes, rivers, and oceans. The heat from our sun warms the water, causing it to evaporate and rise into the atmosphere. The air currents cool the moisture turning it into clouds. The clouds carry precipitation (rain, sleet, snow, hail, etc.) which falls to the earth during storms. This moisture feeds the plant life and falls or becomes runoff filling our bodies of water or becoming ground water, to start the process all over again.

Water Cycle Resource Links

Water Conservation for Kids

Kids can bring awareness of water conservation to their schools and friends. They can start a water conservation club, and encourage their families, friends, and their friends’ families to conserve water at home and in school. Handy tips like washing dishes only when the dishwasher is full, only using the faucet when necessary (instead of leaving it running), and using a broom to clean outdoor areas instead of a hose can save upwards of ten thousand gallons of water per location. Decreased water usage translates to lower water bills. Saving money and helping the planet are two things everyone can get behind.

Community Events

The South Platte Water Renewal Partners hosts four major community events annually where community members are invited to visit our facility and learn about the water renewal process. We also partner with the Cities of Englewood and Littleton at their events to educate the community on the water renewal process.

Learn More

Water Renewal Process

At the South Platte Water Renewal Partners we use a biological treatment process that harnesses the natural power of native bacteria to sustainably clean and renew water using the least amount of chemicals and energy.

Learn More

Blog Feed

Get a deeper look into the operations of the SPWRP with our blog. Learn about the challenges affecting the water renewal process, how we are taking water knowledge into the community and the classroom and how you can be a steward of the South Platte River.

Learn More